Tombstones for the World

On October 26, 1881, Lawman Wyatt Earp exchanged gun fire with three outlaws at the OK Corral in Tombstone, Arizona. He killed his foes in 30 seconds, shots truly heard around the world. Not only did this encounter become a defining moment in the winning of the American West, law allegedly triumphing over lawlessness, it echoed overseas in many countries that perceived America through the intrepid, fearless, gun-toting Wyatt. More legend perhaps than fact? Doesn’t matter. Wyatt shot his way to fame and took his country along with him. Dusty little Tombstone goes global. Continue reading “Tombstones for the World”

Today’s Frontiersmen

Ranchers of southern Arizona stick together. It’s a necessity as they confront the cartels across the border who supply Americans with illicit drugs and kill their fellow Mexicans in appalling numbers. One rancher, Ed Ashurst, has even written a book about another rancher, “The Life and Times of Warner Glenn,” who is portrayed as the model cowboy superior to legend, patient, persevering, good-humored, a skilled tracker of lions and outlaws. Continue reading “Today’s Frontiersmen”

Our Spy in Mexico

At the height of the Cold War in the 1960s, Mexico City was teeming with intrigue. Agents of the United States, the Soviet Union and Cuba jostled one another for information and influence. Writes Gus Russo in his book “Live By The Sword”: “This megalopolis had become the most spy infested in the Western Hemisphere, if not the world.” Continue reading “Our Spy in Mexico”